fbpx

Debris Season 1 Episode 2 Review: You Are Not Alone



We learned a little bit more about the debris and what’s been going on during Debris Season 1 Episode 2.


That’s a welcome development, and it opens a lot of avenues for storytelling.


But the debris-of-the-episode format is here to stay, at least for now, and it’s that format that’s slowly revealing the story.


It’s been three years since the wrecked alien craft was first discovered, and it’s been six months since the debris started falling to earth.


When working with debris, the local jurisdictions are evacuated. Maybe I missed it, but that wasn’t clear on the premiere. We didn’t need to know it for that story, but we do need to know if for this one.


There isn’t a fantastic way to work with a lie, even blaming the Russians, that’s manipulating certain metal items for its use. The frustrating thing about this case, just like the first, is that we don’t know why any of it is happening.


But the good news is that neither does anyone else. That’s the point.


They have determined how to shut down the effects of debris, and in doing that, they probably never discover what a lot of it is doing. If the two cases are any indication, the debris acts in concert with human emotions.


On Debris Season 1 Episode 1, grief created a human being. This time out, more humans were being created, but their purpose wasn’t as clear.


Each clone was compartmentalizing something that the original was hanging onto. Finola and Bryan theorized that it was done as protection to keep the original alive by losing what mattered least to his survival.

I think what we’re seeing is three different fragments of one guy’s personality. Maybe the original Eric they came from is still in the town. They’re dying? Maybe he’s dying. I mean, they were cloned from him.

Finola


But while Bryan discussed the theory’s physical manifestation, shutting down functions to preserve the heart, the debris seemed to be guiding the original mentally, tearing away the, as the story goes, debris, so that Eric could focus on what really mattered.

Finola: You know, I was thinking with the clones, the order in which the first two died.
Bryan: Yeah?
Finola: Let’s say they were connected to Eric. Maybe, if he is out there dying, he’s surrendering parts of himself that matter the least.
Bryan: Basically, when you’re dying, you’re freezing to death in the elements, your body will give up the unnecessary parts to protect the most important thing.
Finola: Yeah, your heart.
Bryan: If that’s true, then he’s out there, hanging on to what matters most.


I hope you read our Jonathan Tucker interview because he alluded to the fact that the debris in this story, physical as it is, is also a metaphor. That suits the direction of the first two episodes very well.


We live every day of our lives trying to sift through the debris of our lives, hoping to find the direction we should be focusing on not only to stay physically fit but to find emotional fulfillment. It’s not easy.


If every episode of Debris works as a sifter, helping viewers remember what’s important in our own lives, then it’s time well spent.


The point is, we need to reframe the way we watch this show. As much as I want to know if it was as simple as the debris forming a barrier to protect Eric, and why it was a physical manifestation with some metal but not all, or what that light was, it doesn’t matter.


It doesn’t even matter how the debris cloned anyone who came close to it. What matters is how what was happening affected people.


And it matters that it’s possibly not the first time debris has cloned someone. It’s hard watching Bryan hold back such important information from Finola the closer they get, but he’s a military man. He’s still in the mindset that he’s to follow orders.


Jonathan Tucker also said in our interview that Maddox saved Bryan in Afghanistan and Bryan sees Maddox as a father figure. Their joshing around certainly shows that relationship, and it could be more than following orders keeping Bryan from sharing what he knows about Finola’s father.

Maddox: Are you alright?
Bryan: Am I ever alright? I shot myself today.
Maddox: Well, that must be hard — seeing the person you love most in the world dead.


Still, Finola’s boss, Priya Ferris, noted that before the alliance between the countries started, they had talked about the importance of transparency.


And when they were pretending to be alone with each other on the call, she seemed to think that if they really cared about Bryan and Finola as they agreed they do, then now is the time for transparency.


So what are they holding back from their agents?


Tucker also noted that what initially seemed like deficits in both characters will be the very tools they need to win their fight. Bryan will learn his vulnerability and empathy aren’t a hindrance but an asset.


And it will be something that the evildoers, Influx, do that pushes Bryan and Finola over the edge into trusting each other first and foremost. But we can see the signs of that here.

Let’s, um, let’s just look out for each other, OK?

Finola


Finola opened up to Bryan about her sister and the mess her father left her with. She shared how disappointed she was in him for leaving her alone, more alone than she’d ever felt, despite his last text message to the contrary.


It’s got to be difficult dealing with such an enormous loss when your sister is only half there. For Finola, her sister is MIA because she’s a drug addict. For Dee Dee, now she feels what it’s like to be abandoned, but with Finola, it’s physical.


And the way that Finola cares about Bryan is going to crack him like an egg. Speaking of crack, I have a group of Facebook friends who welcome others to the bunch with a Peeps or Candy Corn debate. It’s a big deal!

Bryan: Zippo lighter, Pyrex glassware, Crayola Crayons, also made in PA. Cadillacs, they had a trimline named the Fleetwood after Fleetwood, Pennsylvania. The Fleetwood Brome. It was a big car in the ’80s. And, of course, Peeps. Insane for Peeps.
Finola: What’s a “peep”?
Bryan: Come on. You’ve never had a Peep?
Finola: No.
Bryan: A little marshmallow candy?
Finola: No, I’ve never eaten a Peep.
Bryan: Wow. Crack-like. Some people think they taste better when they’re stale. I happen to be one of those people.


Bryan isn’t sharing as much as Finola, but she’s using what she learns about him to strengthen their bond. Granted, a conversation about stale Peeps isn’t an easy one to forget, but that she got him his treasured snack after the day he had was pretty neat of her.


She’s dying to know more, and although she asked about the photo that dead clone Bryan was holding, Bryan was tight-lipped but didn’t close the door on a future conversation. If the debris follows a theme, then that woman in the phone might have kept Bryan alive at one time, too.


I don’t think that he’s working to rid himself of her memory because his clone said he couldn’t let go in a way that seemed to make Bryan wonder why he was trying to do it himself. Who knows what debris will reveal that story?

You know, I can’t help but wonder what aspect of you that I would have been in your clone that matters most because you’re more than just a federal agent. But it’s the only thing you’ve shown me, and that is the least important thing.

Finola


Finola seemed to be struggling with how much emphasis Bryan puts on his profession, and I loved the look he gave her when he told Eric who he was.

Eric: Who are you?
Bryan: I’m a federal agent.


For now, that’s Bryan’s identity, and it will be interesting to see how he slowly comes to terms with the other sides of himself.


And I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention that when we last saw a clone Bryan, he was fused with an Eric and looking awfully gnarly. Do you think they’ll keep samples, or will another clone or two pop up in the future? Could be!


All I know is that if George Jones’ body is about to be exhumed — unless they’re using the most stealth gravediggers in history — Finola is going to know about the living George soon enough.


Hopefully, knowing that her father, or a version of him, is alive will temper the pain she will feel about being lied to about such a significant development. Maybe the whole thing will fly under the radar for a while if Dee Dee is strung out.


Altogether, only six months into the discovery of debris on earth, it makes perfect sense why they’re more concerned — at least to Finola and Bryan’s thinking — about stopping its effects and cleaning the trail and keeping it out of the bad guys’ hands instead of studying it.


Of course, we know they are studying it, even going so far as recreating the ship. And the bad guys know enough about it to use it to their advantage. That gives the possibility that George Jones is working with them more merit, but only time will tell.


We’re are the very beginning of this journey.


So what did you think of “You’re not alone”?


If you haven’t seen it, you can watch Debris online, and then, I hope you’ll join us down below for a discussion. Do you think the points made above are valid?


Did I miss anything that you think we should discuss? I can’t wait to hear from you!

Carissa Pavlica is the managing editor and a staff writer and critic for TV Fanatic. She’s a member of the Critic’s Choice Association, enjoys mentoring writers, conversing with cats, and passionately discussing the nuances of television and film with anyone who will listen. Follow her on Twitter and email her here at TV Fanatic.





Source link

We will be happy to hear your thoughts

Leave a reply

itechtopia.com
Logo
Compare items
  • Total (0)
Compare
0