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Chicago PD Season 8 Episode 10 Review: The Radical Truth



Disco Bob made quite a mess on Chicago PD Season 8 Episode 10.


The Ruzek-focused episode was a nice welcome back following a brief hiatus. And it let our boy Patrick Flueger shine. But that’s not really surprising, is it?


Bob Ruzek’s 30-year career with the CPD has been a bit strained, as has his relationship with his son, Adam.


The two haven’t always seen eye-to-eye, but that’s the thing about parents and kids — there’s always a level of love there no matter what happens.


And Adam was in full-on protective mode when Bob was kidnapped. 

Pop’s, I hope you’re decent. Coming in with a girl!

Ruzek


He was willing to do anything to save Bob because, at the end of the day, that’s his father. 


However, Adam wasn’t naive either. He knew Bob’s vices, so he immediately went to Benny the bar owner thinking that his father was targeted because of his gambling problem.


When it was revealed that Bob paid off his whopping $80,000 debt, it was evident that his situation was much more serious. 


Ruzek had low expectations for his father based on his past mistakes, but he never considered that his father could have been borrowing money for a gang leader to pay back his dues. 


You’d think a cop would know better, but Bob was desperate.


When he couldn’t pay back the money, he was forced to use his badge to find the name of a snitch and sell them out to the gang leader, Barela.


Bob’s situation was bad, but it was salvageable. That is until he did the unthinkable and sold out his son! 


Honestly, there’s no coming back from that, and my guess is that Ruzek and Bob’s relationship will remain fractured from here on out. 


But even so, Ruzek tried to rally behind his father. 


He knew his father made a mistake and didn’t have the best opinion around town, but he couldn’t just stand by and do nothing. 


It’s understandable that Bob wanted them to cut Barela loose as he threatened his whole legacy. He didn’t want his mistakes getting out as it would cost him his pension, his benefits, and most importantly, it would taint the Ruzek name. 


His life’s work was imploding just days before his retirement.

Ruzek: What are you following me?
Burgess: Yes. Yes. Look, you were clearly lying to Voight when you saw that text at your dad’s house. I wanted to make sure you weren’t doing something extracurricular, just plain ol’ stupid. Were you?


But it wasn’t fair of Ruzek to ask Voight to turn a blind eye. As Voight pointed out, this wasn’t just an attack on Bob, it was an attack on the CPD. 


Looking the other way was the equivalent of telling criminals that you can buy the police with enough dirt on them.


Voight has always loved Ruzek like a son, but I’m glad he put him in his place. If I’m being honest, he probably should have pulled Ruzek off the case since it was too close to home. 


Voight urged Ruzek to stop covering for his dad. His father’s mistakes were not his own, and everyone who knew Ruzek knew his true character. 


Of course, Barela’s death was the best possible outcome because when he died, Bob’s secrets died with him. 


But it was a stretch to suggest that Ruzek killed him on purpose to protect his dad or his family name.


Ruzek was in a fragile state of mind and was spiraling a bit, so it’s easy to assume the “worst-case scenario,” especially when you see a man with two shots to the back. 


However, Burgess of all people should’ve never questioned him. She knows him too well to doubt him. And yet, she was the only one that did, even as he maintained that it was a clean shot. 

Voight: We’re talking about trading one life for another.
Ruzek: But one life is Merlin, who’s a gang member. He’s a rat. Boss, you don’t get to the position that Merlin’s in by living some clean life.
Voight: Adam. You don’t get to the position your father’s in by leading a clean life. Do you?
Ruzek: No, sir. But he’s my father. I would make the same trade for you every time.


Voight may have considered that Ruzek took it too far, but he never crossed the line and said it aloud.


He simply trusted him and waited until there was video evidence, which beautifully showed that Adam was telling the truth. 


Despite his emotions running high, he never let them get the best of him. 


When Barela pulled a gun on him, he fired three rounds in self-defense. There was no grey-area. 

Ruzek: The name Ruzek’s going to stain this department, and I gotta lug that around long after my dad is gone.
Voight: All the people that matter, they know who you are.


The tension between Burgess and Ruzek led to one of the best scenes on Chicago PD ever. Whoever wrote that powerful speech deserves all the praise, as does Paddy for those acting chops. Whew, I still have chills. 


While I’m not a fan of driving a wedge between Burgess and Ruzek (again), I love that he stood up for himself. 


Over the course of the past few episodes, Ruzek’s beliefs have been questioned countless times.


He was accused of police brutality (when there was none), Atwater confronted him, and now, the only woman he’s ever really loved thought he was capable of killing a man in cold blood. 


That’s bound to set anyone off. 


But Ruzek wasn’t as angry as much as he was disappointed. 


As he explained, when she arrived on the scene, she didn’t question if he was alright. Instead, her go-to was to ask him what he did, which insinuated that she believed he shot someone without merit. 


You know his heart, Burgess. What the actual hell?

Ruzek: Kim, one of the many reasons that I fell in love with you is that I felt like you believed in me. Like you believed in my in a way that nobody in my entire life has.
Burgess: I did.
Ruzek: Even me.
Burgess: I do.
Ruzek: I’m not so sure.
Burgess: You have to see how what I said made sense in the moment. You have to see that.
Ruzek: I don’t. After everything that you and I have been through, there just should have been something that held you back from the edge of assumption. Some sort of guardrail that kept you from going over that ledge. I mean, if this situation is reversed — I’m you; you’re me — and I run up on you, you’re standing over Barela holding a gun. If I got close to the ledge, fine, I wouldn’t go over. Not ever. Cause I know your heart. And I know that there’s not a world in which you’d kill a man in cold blood, that you’d shoot him in the back as he’s running away. For what — revenge? For your family name? Come on. That’s what you meant when you said, “what did you do.” In that moment, I’d have thought you’d know my heart. You’re supposed to know.
Burgess: I do know your heart. I do. And I’m sorry.
Ruzek: Thanks for stopping by.


I don’t know what this means for their future, though I’m not counting them out just yet; I have faith in them.


It’s going to take a bit for her to earn back his trust. I hope that by seeing him so raw and vulnerable, she’s encouraged to take a step back and do some soul searching because she crossed a pretty big line.


Burgess has never actually lost Ruzek. Even when they weren’t together or at their lowest, he was always there for her.


Maybe realizing that he might not always be there will force her to come to terms with what she really wants? 


At the end of the day, Ruzek may have won the case, but two of the most important relationships in his life were fractured, possibly forever.


He was left disappointed and betrayed by the people he loves the most, and when Adam is hurting, I’m hurting!


Also, I shouldn’t have to say it, but I have to say it: where is Makayla? Who is watching her? Why did the show give Burgess a storyline about fostering a child that’s been sidelined for weeks? 


The promo for next week teases some hot and heavy moments for #Upstead. Are you ready?


Let us know your thoughts on the episode in the comments below! And know that you can watch Chicago PD online to catch up on episodes now!

Lizzy Buczak is a staff writer for TV Fanatic. Follow her on Twitter and read her personal blog at CraveYouTV.





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